Contractions aren’t tricky to teach?

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Teaching about contraction words in the early elementary grades can be confusing for students – until you introduce games, visual aids, and other hands-on activities to help them understand they get to take a “shortcut” in grammar.

Once students learn where to put the apostrophe when they form contractions, it opens up a whole new world of writing fun.

Maybe even do contractions bingo just to first introduce the topic and then make a list of all the options they can come up with on the board or chart paper?

They’ll love it!

Need even more amazing ideas?  Keep reading the guest post below from Colleen Gallagher.  Love!

Teaching about contraction words can be confusing for students until you introduce games, visual aids, and other hands-on activities.

There are some things that I find tricky to teach… Contractions to me, are very tricky to teach.

Just when you think you have done your job and the kiddos seem to have grasped contractions, you read over a writing assignment and wonder… Did I teach them about contractions????

You know then it’s time to review. Hopefully after you read this post you will have a few new ideas of ways to review contractions with your kiddos.

Would you like premade worksheets and games to teach or review contractions?  
Click HERE to grab them and save yourself time!

Packet include 11 pages with a poster, contraction word search, and 18 contraction puzzles!

Contraction Packet Cover

What is a Contraction Word?

Contractions are two common words that create one.  They are formed by combining the two words from the english language and shortening them with a connecting apostrophe.

One trick I have that seems to help is…

Remind students that the little apostrophe likes to “eat” letters from words and then sticks all the remaining letters together and makes it a shorter way for us to read it.

One of my favorite reviews of contractions is this little song which I have had filed away for years & bring out when teaching and reteaching about contractions.

The Contraction Song
(to the tune of “London Bridge is Falling Down”)

I’m the first word; don’t change me!
Don’t change me, don’t change me.
I’m the first word; don’t change me!
Oh, no, just let me be.
When you change the second word,
Second word, second word,
When you change the second word,
A shorter word you’ll see.

Certain letters are taken out,
Taken out, taken out.
Certain letters are taken out.
One word will remain.

Apostrophe will fill that space,
Fill that space, fill that space.
Apostrophe will fill that space,
The rest will stay the same.

Can’t and couldn’t, isn’t, too.
Isn’t, too, isn’t, too,
Won’t and I’ve and let’s, it’s true,
Contractions every one.

I’m and she’s and you’re and he’d,
You’re and he’d, you’re and he’d,
Wouldn’t, didn’t, we’ll and she’d,
Good! And now we’re done.

(works for most contractions but not examples such as ’tis, o’clock, man-o’-war…)

by: Jill Mitchell

Contraction Worksheets

I also wanted to share a contractions printable center I created as a way to review contractions.

Teaching about contraction words can be confusing for students until you introduce games, visual aids, and other hands-on activities.

Basically, the students match the contraction on the umbrella to a raindrop with the two words on it that make the given contraction.

Click here to download and use the file from Colleen.

Other useful resources to use when teaching about contractions:

Teaching about contraction words can be confusing for students until you introduce games, visual aids, and other hands-on activities.

You have to check out Buzzing About Second Grade. They share the cutest idea for teaching contractions. Words having boo-boo’s and needing a fix!

Love these anchor charts too!

Teaching about contraction words can be confusing for students until you introduce games, visual aids, and other hands-on activities.

Using paint chips from the home improvement store is genius!

Teaching about contraction words can be confusing for students until you introduce games, visual aids, and other hands-on activities.

This example shows using colored tape to cover up the missing letters when showing how to form the new words.

Teaching about contraction words can be confusing for students until you introduce games, visual aids, and other hands-on activities.

Eeeep!  Contraction Surgery!  Adorable!

“You’re” the best for stopping by my guest post!

BE Happy Teaching Contractions Friends!

Colleen Gallagher

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