Free Figurative Language eBook

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it, especially to littles, can be a task.

Learning the differences between idioms, similes, and metaphors can be tough for students who have trouble with abstract ideas.

Let’s find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

I have always LOVED to use the chapter book Punished! by David Lubar with my third graders. But you could always tell who understood the figurative language references and who did not by the laughter (or blank stares).

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

Using the same book with older students definitely resulted in more giggles as I read aloud.

It really shows how students who have not yet mastered abstract concepts might struggle with simple figurative language understanding, let alone expecting them to add it independently to their writing assignments.

6 Types of Figurative Language

There is an entire list for different types of figurative language:

  • Simile
  • Metaphor
  • Personification
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Oxymoron
  • Hyperbole
  • Allusion
  • Idiom
  • Imagery
  • Symbolism
  • Alliteration
  • Assonance
  • Consonance
  • Metonymy
  • Synecdoche
  • Irony
  • Sarcasm
  • Litotes
  • Pun
  • Anaphora
  • Tautology
  • Understatement

But when teaching beginning figurative language, elementary teachers tend to stick with these 6 types:

Simile – Involves the comparison of 2 things; uses the words like or as

Example: The boy was brave as a lion.

Metaphor – Figure of speech where an object or action is said to be something else, but not literally.

Example: My sister is the black sheep in our family.

Personification – Applying a human quality to something nonhuman

Example: The wind howled through the night and kept me awake.

Idiom – A phrase of words that means something completely different from the meanings of the separate words.

Example: It’s raining cats and dogs outside.

Pun – A joke that uses a multiple meaning word in a different way than usual.

Example: Why do amphibians take the bus? Because their cars are always getting toad.

Onomatopoeia – A word that sounds like the way it is read

Example: sizzle or whoosh

I know I said 6 types, but I live this one so much, I included a bonus figure of speech…

Bonus: Alliteration – A phrase or sentence that has multiple words that begin with the same sound.

Example: Sandy shows us her seashells she searched for at the sea.

Anchor Chart Examples

Need some classroom anchor charts to help your visualize learners? Check out these great suggestions below!

Love this basic chart that describes so many different types of figures of speech in one spot!

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

Lots of fun examples for basic types of figurative language.

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

Angry Birds never looked so good in a classroom!

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

The hand drawn images are adorable on this anchor chart.

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

Reading and Language Arts Power Pack

11 reading and language arts resource sets that pack a punch!

Reading and LA Power Pack Cover

This power pack includes the following 11 files:

  • Beach Activities Pack (K-6)
  • Chapter Book Reading Strategies Activities  (grades 3-8)
  • Chrysanthemum Reading Packet (grades 2-4)
  • Contraction Packet (grades 1-3)
  • DI Spelling Menus Packet (grade 2+)
  • Never Ride Your Elephant to School Activities (grades 2-4)
  • Reading Bingo (grades 2-8)
  • Space Theme Reading Logs (grades 2-5)
  • Fiction and Nonfiction Story Maps (grades 2-6)
  • Vocabulary Bingo (grades 3+)
  • Writing Menu (grades 3+)

See more details HERE.

Explaining the difference between figurative and literal language perfectly!

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

This idiom of the week chart is awesome! It can be easily changed from week to week and will really help students who aren’t familiar with many idioms.

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

Free Figurative Language eBook

Sometimes, I throw out a Collaboration Wednesday question on Facebook and thanks to the fans at The OC Blog’s Facebook fan page, I was able to put together an 11-page freebie eBook all about ideas for teaching figurative language!

Very cool and thanks to all those who contributed in the newest eBook!

Figurative language will make your students better writers. But, teaching it can be a task. Let's find some ways to make it fun, engaging, and memorable!

Enjoy!

What are your best figurative language instruction tips? We would love to hear them in a comment below!

~Charity

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