Literally Hands-On

|

As always, I’m so happy to pop in here at the awesome OC Blog. Today I have something short and sweet to share with you.

While I was conducting some classroom walkthroughs this week, a very cool visual caught my eye.

This teacher understands the power of visual representations and she has clearly established routines for minimizing interruptions.

I have to admit it feels kind of original that I found this myself in an actual classroom and not on Pinterest!

This teacher understands the power of visual representations and she has clearly established routines for minimizing interruptions.

Cute, right? But beyond that, just seeing this on the board made two things very clear to me.

I know that this teacher understands the power of visual representations and she has clearly established routines for minimizing interruptions.

I did indeed see children using the signals as I was in the room, so she is clearly using the system she put in place.

You might want to check out:

Classroom Routines eBook Cover

Need some new ideas for simple routines in your classroom? This 155 page digital book has you covered!

Includes 28 articles from Organized Classroom, including topics such as:
• Classroom Jobs
• Organizing Absent Work
• Solutions for Constant Tattling
• A Quick Idea for Student Engagement
• Helping Student Get Organized
• Remembering Names on Papers
• Organizing All the Paperwork
• Bathroom Break Tips
…and even more!

Includes 10 additional freebie files! No need to enter in an email address for each one separately – just click and go!  

See it HERE.

Even if you don’t use signals for routine things like this teacher, I can see lots of other uses for these little hands.

What about using them for number recognition, listing steps in directions or schedule reminders?

Help your ELL students recognize some culturally accepted gestures that they might not be familiar with. I was very surprised in one of my undergrad classes when I learned that hand signals can have extremely different meanings in different cultures!

Students are always fascinated by sign language. How about an ASL alphabet to go along with your standard alphabet? This being so close to our celebration of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., I can’t help but also notice that the hands are both different shades. That in itself can be a way to initiate a discussion and help all students see that they are represented as part of one classroom community.

I love to visit other teachers’ classrooms. Even when I’m there for something routine or incidental, my eyes are always open. You never know when you might stumble upon something that could really inspire you!

Until next time,

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.